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eraser tool(HELP)

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mush Posted: Wed, Jul 2 2008 11:05

 Hi

i have "coreldraw grafics suite 12" and im very new  for this software. I just want to erase some part of a circle.

i know its a basic thing but im unable to do this  :(

 

Any Help or Clue would be appriciated 

Thanks in advance

Top 100 Contributor
Southern California
Male

Hi mush!

If your talking about CorelDraw 12 (not PhotoPaint) the "Simplify" tool works well for this.  Draw another object over your circle that defines the area you want to erase.  Select both that object and your circle withe the "Pick" tool and then select the "Simplify" tool that will appear on the top of your page.  Then select the new object your created and move it out of the way.   You'll see that it leaves an "erased" area in your original circle.  Play with it a little to make it exactly the way you would like.

Rob

mush replied on Wed, Jul 2 2008 19:18

 hi,

thanks for your reply and im using CorelDraw 12 (not PhotoPaint) . still i have a problem.

whenever i select both objects(square and circle) and click (shaping->simplify) the option, then i select  and move out the  square. now i can see the erased area but still there is a line across the circle :( .

what should i do know ? i want to erase some portion of a circle and thats it and i dont need anything else in circle .

Thanks

Top 200 Contributor
Pottstown,PA
Male

 Do you want to erase part of a circle so that it then becomes an arc? You want to be left with a path that is not closed? - Scotty

 

Change to the "node edit" or "shape" tool once you've drawn your circle and simply move the two ends to leave a gap. Once you've done that, Willstu's idea about simplifying works (although I would use "Trim"Wink)

replied on Wed, Jul 9 2008 4:07

I find it hard to understand why Corel do not like an Eraser tool.Hmm

They do: it's under the fly-out for shaping or hit [X]. But for the question asked, it's probably not the best tool to use-

If you draw a circle, it's an enclosed shape, not an arced line. So the eraser will eat chunks out of the circle and leave "tooth marks" in it.
If you want to use it to get only an arc of the circle, then it has to be an arc first, then it will work.

{PS it only works on one (selected) object at a time - grouping won't work, although you can combine to create one object and use the eraser on it}

replied on Wed, Jul 9 2008 7:05

It's under the Crop flyout actually...

I try to draw a circle, then I drag the node side way to make it an arc. But if I undo it, I find something interesting - the little square node becomes a flat line (like a minus sign), and when I drag it, the circle becomes a sector (like a pacman).

Also, using this way to "erase" part of a circle, you always start at the top (I guess).

Also, when I use the eraser tool, it doesn't really "erase" the part but deform it - the circle remains a completed path and not an incomplete arc.

 

 

Drag inside - Pac-man.

Drag outside - C.

You have to start at the top if you drag a circle from top to bottom, but you can start at the bottom if you drag from bottom to top. Or just type in the anges on the interactive toolbar.

If you can fill the shape, it's a closed shape. If you can't it's a line/curve/arc. A closed shape will always be "deformed" by the eraser (it is erasing the area you rub over)

replied on Wed, Jul 9 2008 21:01

When using the shape tool on a circle, there is only one node at the top. In the other word, you cannot clear any part of the circle as you like without rotating it precisely to the orientation you want.

As for the eraser tool, couldn't it be just as simple as its name would suggest like in the Photoshop? Just erase, nothing else.

MichaelTadashi:
When using the shape tool on a circle, there is only one node at the top. In the other word, you cannot clear any part of the circle as you like without rotating it precisely to the orientation you want.

Step 1: Draw a circle - Select the 'circle' tool. Click on a start point. Drag to an end point. Holding <ctrl> will ensure that it's a circle rather than oval. Holding <shift> will make the start point the centre of the circle.

Step 2: Shape the circle - Select the 'shape' tool. Select the node at the top and drag the mouse - the nodes are constrained to the circumference of the circle; place it at the start or the end of the "cut-out" section. Select the node remaining at the top of the circle and drag it to the other end of the "cut-out". If the mouse is inside the circle, it will form a pie. If it's on the outside, it will form an arc. (If you get the 'start' and 'end' mixed up - which I always do - there is a handy button to invert the arc on the interactive toolbar; clockwise <-> anti-clockwise)

Step 1.5a: While still in the 'circle mode' click on the central X and the handles change to rotational handles - drag a corner to make the 'top' somewhere else, then you only need to shape the circle once.
Step 1.5b: From the interactive toolbar, click on the rotational angle field and type in an angle to move the "top" somewhere else, then you only need to shape the circle once.
Step 1.5c: From the interactive toolbar, click on the "arc mode" button and it automatically eats a 90º chunk from the circle to leave you with an arc.
Step 1.5d: From the interactive toolbar, input a start and end angle for the arc (or just one and shape the other one) (This could be step 1: set the start and end angles before you touch mouse to paper space)

You don't even need to be precise with the cut-out section of the arc: just use the trim tool to tidy the edges. (But with the 'Dynamic Guidelines' on, being precise is a snap Wink)

As for the eraser tool, couldn't it be just as simple as its name would suggest like in the Photoshop? Just erase, nothing else.
Confused erm... Photoshop = bitmap program. CorelDraw = vector program. If you want to compare like for like, then use the eraser in PhotoPaint.:shrug:

It does exactly what you would expect: erases the part of the object under the eraser. Please refer to this post to get a better idea on how a vector image works and in turn how the eraser works.

 

replied on Thu, Jul 10 2008 4:22

I'll check out the links on the thread you mentioned.

Thanks.

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