Resizing Characters

How do I resize a character to be thinner/fatter or taller/shorter?

24 Replies

  • Michael

    If you mean Expansion(Fatter or shorter) and Condensation (Thinner or Taller) of Text, then it is possible in case of Artistic text only. Not in paragraph text.

    Michael
    How do I resize a character to be thinner/fatter or taller/shorter?

     

    Anand

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In reply to Anand Dixit:

    Hi Anand, I know about that.

    But with artistic text, I can only adjust the whole text together, and not individual character.
    For example, let's say I type the word "FAT", and I only want the "A" to be wider or taller.

  • In reply to Anonymous:

     There are a couple of ways to deal with your problem.  First, if you must maintain the text as text, and I'm not sure why you want to do that, try the following. - Select the text with your shape tool (F10). Each letter will have a dot or node in front of it. Click on the one in front of the letter you want to modify. Then do a Ctrl + T to bring up the text formatting window. Here you can change the font, size, rotation, etc. of just the letter selected. Also by moving these nodes, you can move individual letters left, right, up or down.

    Another way is to select the text and then 1. convert it to curves - Arrange-Covert to Curves. Then 2. Arrange-Break Curve Apart. This will convert each letter to a separate element. If you have a letter like a capital A, which needs to have a hole in it. Select the two elements of the letter and combine them. That will create the needed hole.

    A third way would be to create the word as separate elements, for example if you have the word SMALL, and you want the A to be smaller, create one text group of SM, another of A, and a third of LL. That way you can manipulate the A all you want, and it is still text.

    Hope this helps.

  • In reply to wildawson:

    in artistic mode select the text with the shape (node) too. Click the little square (bottom of each letter) to select the text you want to modify, then moduify how you wish. Can change bold to regular, italisized, etc. If you want to make taller (stretch) you will need  break apart and adjust individually

    You can adjust one letter at a time in paragraph mode by dragging and selecting individule letters with the text tool

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In reply to wildawson:

    Hi wildawson,

    Using the text tool, I can only change the common properties e.g. font, font size, angle, etc., but I cannot adjust the width or height of the character.

    Converting the text to curve would work, but it'll be painful if I have 20 letters.

    Creating the word in separate segments will have the same problem with curve when I have many letters.

    Let me describe what I want to achieve.
    Let's say I type the word "TESTING 1 2 3" using font Times New Roman.
    I want the individual letter to be half the width with the spacing/kerning remains.

    For Arial, I have the "slim" version Arial Thin.
    But that's the only font I have that have a thin version.

    In Photoshop, it's much more easier with just a single click in the Character pallette.
    I'm just wondering whether there's a similar way in CorelDraw.

  • In reply to Anonymous:

    Not there isnt a way. I understand what you are wanting, unfortunately that aspect in photoshop is actually / technically incorrect when it comes to typography from what i understand even though it is useful in certain instances

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In reply to Richard Reilly:

    It could be technically incorrect in terms of typography, but if there is a thin version of Arial, why not for other fonts?

    It is useful when I want to use certain fonts for a long phrase that I want to squeeze into a narrow area.

  • In reply to Anonymous:

    Michael
    but if there is a thin version of Arial, why not for other fonts?

    As you said it's a Narrow ("thin") version; not a stretched (squeezed) Arial.

    It's another Font ("Arial Narrow" Font) in the same Typeface ("Arial" Family). It could be a separate Typeface ("Arial Narrow" sub-Family) if it's a TrueType or Type 1 on Windows.

    Michael
    It is useful when I want to use certain fonts for a long phrase that I want to squeeze into a narrow area.

    Use Font Families that contain Condensed (narrow) Fonts.

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In reply to Ahmad Ajlouny:

    Ahmad Ajlouny
    Use Font Families that contain Condensed (narrow) Fonts.

    Do most fonts have that?
    So far I only have Arial Narrow in my font library, I've never seen any Times New Roman Narrow, Verdana Narrow, etc.



    [edited by: Michael at 5:55 (GMT -7) on Fri, Sep 12 2008]
  • In reply to Anonymous:

    There are many fonts which currently do not have a narrow version (most of them, actually). CorelDraw does not give you the chance to make what you want in a way which is optically correct. Traditionally, it is considered incorrect to just squeeze the text, since it tends to produce unprofessionally-looking results. Try reducing the kerning or the point size. Most probably, it will look better than just squeezing.

  • In reply to Anonymous:

    The fonts was made by design, and we suppose that the creator made this shape for any good reason. The Arial Black is not a deformation of Arial, and the Arial Thin was not a made by deforming other font.

    You can apply a outline for made it "more bold" but the best way is to use a real typeface family, with all options (thin, light, regular, medium, bold, black, extrablack, extended, condensed)

  • In reply to Anonymous:

    wrote in message news:33670@coreldraw.com...
    > Ahmad Ajlouny:Use Font Families that contain Condensed (narrow) Fonts.
    >
    > Do most fonts have that?
    > So far I only have Arial Narrow in my font library, I've never seen any
    > Times New Roman Narrow, Verdana Narrow, etc.
    >

    Corel gives you a tremendous value in the number of fonts you get with the
    Suite. That said, there are tens of thousands of various fonts in the world.
    There are many "narrow" fonts in the various font families out there; you'll
    just want to go to a place like myfont.com and search for them. Granted, you
    will need to purchase the font(s), but they're not too expensive.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In reply to Hunter:

    Thanks for all the replies.

    I guess the easiest way to solve the problem is to alter the letters in Photoshop and then import the resulting image into CorelDraw, which is what I'm doing.
    Most of the times the font size will be 24 and above so I won't be too bad when imported CorelDraw.
    I rarely face the situation though, just once a while.

  • In reply to Anonymous:

    Michael
    Ahmad Ajlouny
    Use Font Families that contain Condensed (narrow) Fonts.
    Do most fonts have that?
    So far I only have Arial Narrow in my font library, I've never seen any Times New Roman Narrow, Verdana Narrow, etc.

    "Narrow" is the name of the condensed version of the Arial typeface. So in different typefaces, you might find different names for the condensed version; "Myriad Pro Cond", "Frutiger Condensed", "Helvetica Narrow", for example.

    Should I also mention that you can use a typeface whose regular style has a narrow set width. Set width is the width of the letter's body plus a space that protects it from the other letters.

  • In reply to Ahmad Ajlouny:

    some programs allows to apply a special feature that was not included in the real typeface. For example, PageMaker allows to make an Arial Black "bold" (more Black than Black), or a Zapf Chancery "italic" (the "normal" font is italic, but it becomes more italic). But, when you send to the Postscript printers, RIP, or try to create a PDF (export as PDF or create a PDF using Acrobat Distiller), this kind of effect causes an error. It's something common. Of course, Photoshop has not problem... if you flatten all layers and save as TIF or JPG, there's no text and there's no problem..