Corel Draw x4 on MAC os 10.5

Is corel draw x4 supporting Mac OS 10.5........?Smile 

36 Replies - Latest Reply

  • CorelDRAW Graphics Suite X4 is a Windows application (XP or Vista). On a Mac, all reports are that it works great within a virtual machine such as VMWare Fusion or Parallels. Another option to run CorelDRAW on a Mac is to use BootCamp that comes with Mac OS 10.5.

    Gérard

  • In reply to Gerard Metrailler:

     Thanks for the answer. Anyways waht do u mean by virtual machine does that mean that we have to create or instal another operating system than the 10.5 such as XP or vista on mac to get started with corel X4. Can I know why did corel quit supporting MAC os10.5 directly it was till Corel 11 that it supported the MAC os ???

  • In reply to Jithin009:

    Jithin,

    The answer is quite simple, there was so few Mac sales that it wasn't
    justified to develop new Mac versions.

    I don't think that will change now since the new versions of CorelDRAW work
    so well running in a virtual machine.
  • The short answer is no.  The long answer is difficult, however as an output provider since the beginning of time today I'm seeing fewer and fewer MAC files in my work.  As IT support we are seeing Apple laptops being used quite a bit but they are only running Windows on them.

  • In reply to FosterCoburn:

     Sir plz. explain on the topic VIrtual Machine I am hearing it from the begining but plz. explain.

  • In reply to David Milisock:

     Thanks for ur kind reply sir. But if I want to buy corel draw for MAX OS 10.5 which is the most suitable one & will it be available in the ASIAN markets...?

  • In reply to Jithin009:

    To be able to use CorelDRAW Graphics Suite X4 on a Macintosh computer, you have two options.

    Either you use the BootCamp feature that comes with MacOS 10.5 and install Windows XP / Windows Vista on a separate partition. The other option is for you to use a Virtual Machine software (VMWare Fusion is the one I would recommend for this). A Virtual Machine enables you to run Windows XP / Vista within a Window on your Mac. 

    In both cases (BootCamp or Virtual Machine), you will need to have a license of MS Windows.

    Gérard

  • In reply to Gerard Metrailler:

     Thankyou sir thankyou verymuch this will definitely solve my problem.

  • In reply to Jithin009:

    Hello Gerard,

    do you know if a future version of CGS for Apple Computers will be released some day? 

    Greetings, Jens

  • In reply to flitzefisch:

    All I can tell is that Corel has not announced any plans to have a Mac version in the future.

  • In reply to Gerard Metrailler:

    It has been a while since the original post, are things still working well for folks using draw and VMware on a mac? I am using X3 on VMware and I hate to say it but I think draw crashes more here than it had on a dedicated windows machine (if that is even possible). I have always been a corel fan (for years now), but I have found that in order to get things done reliably I have been leaning heavily on Illustrator more and more. 

  • In reply to TekART:

     

    I use BootCamp for an MacPro-XP machine and BootCamp for an iMac-VISTA machine... CorelDRAW X3 and X4 works great on both.
    Just as good or better than on a native XP machine. But I rarely use the Mac OS and built-in programs anyway. Workin' on an obstinate pdf file worked great for me about a month ago, using the iMac with Leopard (10.5?) though. Then when I got it to a point where it would work on my BootCamp-Windows machines I wailed on the file. I rarely crash on either machine and have lots of programs running concurrently with multiple files open.

    Devil  the 'dd'

     

  • In reply to Gerard Metrailler:

    Gérard,

    I have used MS products for some thirty years, but now that I have finally moved everything to Macs, I am totally enjoying the experience. The thought of introducing Windows to my Mac platform completely negates the reason I left Microsoft Windows in the first place.  I own older versions of Corel Draw for my old PCs, but I don't use them any more. I would like to, but, a decision by Corel, long ago, to forgo a Mac port was made. At the time, I believe your decision was prudent, but that was at least six years ago. A lot has happened in those six years. More to the point, it is today that a look at the future of computing should be reexamined.

    Apple has been on a steady upswing in market share in the desktop format for some time now. The +$1000.00 laptop format has Apple claiming 90% of that market. All of this has been happening during one of the most serious economic time periods in history.

    It appears the global marketplace is starting to make a positive shift, and I'm sure we all hope this trend continues. My point is that, if Apple has been able to make these strides in this market, then it stands to reason that they will continue this growth pattern in the days and years to come.

    Is Corel reactionary, or proactive? Is Corel content to capitulate to Adobe in the Mac market? This is not the Apple of old, so don't stand on your decisions of old, thinking that they are still relevant today.

    Here's hoping that Corel realizes that they can be competitive and profitable in the Mac market.

    Al

  • In reply to Al:

    Al

    Is Corel reactionary, or proactive? Is Corel content to capitulate to Adobe in the Mac market? This is not the Apple of old, so don't stand on your decisions of old, thinking that they are still relevant today.

    Here's hoping that Corel realizes that they can be competitive and profitable in the Mac market.

    I totally agree with you.

     

    FosterCoburn
    The answer is quite simple, there was so few Mac sales that it wasn't justified to develop new Mac versions.

    The answer is not so simple. I know several companies that still use CorelDRAW 11 on Mac, altough uses CorelDRAW X4 under PC and there's no real way to know how much CorelDRAW 11 users have isntalled the program on Mac on both systems. Mac is a small marketplace ( recently, their sales increases from 4.5% to 5.2% of the total marketplace) but is a very special marketplace for professional graphic design.If the problem were only the small marketplace, you can't explain why Corel develop a Mac version for Painter. The answer is obvious, CorelPainter works fine on Mac and is a success, but CorelDRAW never worked fine on Mac as native program.

    The problem is more complex, is not only about to want to develop a new version, also is about the software compatibilities (ie, the .NET framework, Visual Basic and Visual Studio, etc) and the company policies. Altough the v.11.0 was "the same installation" for Mac and Windows, the results was not the same. bitstream FontNavigator doesn't manage Mac fonts, then don't auto-install it when you open a document. You can't use the VBA macros, one of the more useful and powerful options of CorelDRAW. Most of the commands are different because it causes conflict with Mac OS shortcuts. So, you will use a half or less of the CorelDRAW power, and you have a slow and porr software, if you compare the same with the Windows version.

    If CorelDRAW comes to Mac, must develop a new, totally new native Mac OS X version. Older CorelDRAW for Mac are the Windows software translated to Mac (I remember the v.8.0 for Mac, a nightmare) but don't works fine. But develop a new and powerful CorelDRAW for Mac requires a lot of time, effort and money, and sounds logical to use this resources to create a powerful and stable Windows version before move to the dark side.

  • In reply to Ariel:

    "dark side"... heh heh.
     
    Now here's a provocative question: Would Apple even exist today if they hadn't created the ipod?
     
    In spite of massive income from ipods which can be used to support their computer division, Macs still represent a small percentage of computer users overall. Perhaps nature has spoken.
     
    Personally, I have no opinion of Apple products, but I don't use them either.
     
    I wonder if the people that support Apple's vision and products do so out of emotion more than logic, since creative personalities can avoid/resent the mainstream in their lifestyles. meaning:
     
    Microsoft + Dell + capitalism + traditional/conservative thinking + less emotion/more facts = "the PC way"
     
    Apple + art + music + liberal thinking + social/environmental movements = "the Mac way"
     
    We see this train of thought in Apple's ad campaigns, making the PC guy look dorky and square.
     
    So... my point is this: the people that insist that mac's are the greatest computers ever, are they speaking primarily based on technical merits or because they like the way the curvy & futuristic hardware looks? Or also how the O/S looks?
     
    <Ariel> wrote in message news:70344@coreldraw.com...

    ...sounds logical to use this resources to create a powerful and stable Windows version before move to the dark side.



    [edited by: Jeff Harrison at 18:58 (GMT -5) on Wed, Oct 21 2009]