Maintaining DPI for hi-res printing. - Corel PHOTO-PAINT X3 - CorelDRAW X3 and older - CorelDRAW Community

Maintaining DPI for hi-res printing.

OK Photo-Paint users,

I thought of a question that has been bugging me for a while. Perhaps you could shed some light on this for me.

I am confused about checking and maintaining the dpi of a hi-res image.

Here is my usual situation:

I take a high-res image using a Canon 20D which shoots 8.2 mega-pixels.

A typical image size is 3504x2336 and it's between 3 to 5 MB depending on the image of course. The camera saves them as .jpg

I open it in PPX3 and do a few things to it and now I want to save it at the same hi-res it was in the first place.

Is it best to just do a Save-As and maybe choose the TIFF format, or choose .jpg with no added compression and a 4:4:4 sub-format?

How do I check what the dpi was in the original photo?

Should I be using Image / ReSample to save it?

Resample always defaults to 72dpi for web images. If I bump up the dpi setting to 300, does that have a bad effect on the image?

Anyway, what's the best way to maintain the highest resolution for printing large images?

Thanks in advance!

 

47 Replies

  • Decal_Designs

    Is it best to just do a Save-As and maybe choose the TIFF format, or choose .jpg with no added compression and a 4:4:4 sub-format?

    JPG is a good format for screen, but not for printing. TIFF is better, CPT and PSD too, specially if you have transparent background.

    How do I check what the dpi was in the original photo?

    Open the original image, and go to File/Document Properties. There you will have image resolution (Width and Height) in Pixels.

    Should I be using Image / ReSample to save it?

    Not, to save it, but to resample if you need it.

    Resample always defaults to 72dpi for web images. If I bump up the dpi setting to 300, does that have a bad effect on the image?

    If you enlarge document original size, this will have a bad effect on the image. May be not so bad, depend on image quality and amount of enlargement.

    Anyway, what's the best way to maintain the highest resolution for printing large images?

    This depend on image resolution, how large will be printed, and how close will be viewed.

  • In reply to Michael Cervantes:

    Michael has brought up some good questions in responce to yor questions.

    I do not use PP so I cannot really help here (I'm and DRAW guy) yet I would venture to say that saving in the native PP format would be best. depending on the final output you may need to switch file types and the final output will determine which is best suited for that specifc need.

    I would copy the image (jpeg) from the camera to a folder. Open the file in PP and save as cpt. Keept eh original as is in case you need to visit at a later date. Modify the cpt file for your specific needs. When ready to send to print or web, etc. change (save as)  to proper working space and file type. This method keeps more files on your system yet if you ever come across a corrupt file you will always have the master files.




    [edited by: fluid at 22:03 (GMT -7) on Wed, May 16 2007]
  • In reply to Richard Reilly:

    hi Fluid,

    I recommend either PNG or tiff with LZW. The reason is that quick-view
    programs like ACDSee etc. can see these, unlike the CPT format.

    JD

    fluid wrote:

    Open the file
    > in PP and save as cpt. Keep the original as is in case you need to visit
    > at a later date.
  • In reply to Jeff Harrison:

     I agree Jeff. Guess I didnt make myself clear :) go figure. I was just trying to say one the image was brought in from the camera, saving a master file as cpt than a Save As for the file type needed for printing. This way if you need to revisit the image the "master" file is always there. PNG's are great I am trying to get them figured out for my gallery images. Figured id pick your brain at Corel World if thee is time :)
     

     

  • In reply to Richard Reilly:

    Hi Fluid,

    ha ha, still confusion... I'd totally bypass the CPT step.

    The master file would be the jpeg from the camera. The final file would
    be PNG, which is highly compatible with anything and viewable in all
    quick viewers. No need that I can see for a CPT, unless multiple objects
    are required.

    This is because CPT can only be opened by PP, an only imported into a
    extremely limited amount of progs like Draw (maybe ventura too).

    PNG's come into anything - video/3D progs etc, also Draw and office
    apps. Anything, seriously.

    For 24 bit web use, I still use jpeg, just with very little compression.
    Almost everyone over compresses jpegs FME.

    JD
  • In reply to Jeff Harrison:

    I got ya. My whole thinking is like working with a cdr file. If I am given a eps file to manipulate and modify for a web graphic. I import into draw, make my edits and save the cdr file. I then export the cdr file as a png, jpeg, gif  for the web purpose. If I am sending to a vendor it is exported as ai, eps or pdf. The cdr being the "master file"  If the file is brought into PP and edited (color correction, masking, etc.) why would you save that back to a jpeg and not keep it the native PP format? Obviously that file type is limited with opening in other apps yet that is why one would "save as" to an applicable file type.

     

     

  • In reply to Richard Reilly:

     I chip in very quckly,

    I can understand the idea of saving as a cpt file. Jpeg is a destructive file format, So if you are to image adjust the image then I would suggest to save a copy to the file format cpt or tiff.

    When I take photos to use in a collage illustration for let say a magazine, I use my very un-proffessional camera that I still like a lot: Canon Powershot A95. In the camera itself I choose the absolute highest image quality. I then take import the image into my Computer and put it in the file folder. From there I open the image and because I am to image adjust and work with the image, I save it to 300 dpi/ppi in Photo-Paint. If I need a RAW format image I DONT use my Powershot A95, I then use my girlfriends camera.


  • In reply to Stefan Lindblad:

     To more pointing out from my earlier post: "...I save it to 300 dpi/ppi in Photo-Paint as a CPT file."
    I forgot to say cpt-file. CPT is lighter in weight than tiff. And I dont make it cmyk until I am to send it to my client. I work with the image/photo in RGB.


  • Check the maintain original size box in the re sample dialog and re sample to the resolution required for output.  You will see the physical dimension change.  The physical size that you can print for any image is dictated by the original pixel count, (image size in Corel PP) By following the above procedure you can set the resolution to that required for output and PP will automatically display and size the image to the maximum physical size for that resolution.

    Always use TIF or CPT format for best quality.

    All layered (multiple objects) files, duotones and spot colored files must be placed into Draw as CPT files.  The reasons are about a 10 page dissertation on postscript output.

  • In reply to David Milisock:

    One piece of advice I got from a printer is to not convert your files to CMYK. Do all the work in RGB, save all your original work as TIF or CPT, then take the work to the printer and make them responsible. In my experience, that makes life easier. Another option is to save the finished file as a PDF if you're taking it to a service bureau. I've had great results with that. However, if you do use the service bureau, create a folder where you save all your file components, including any fonts you may use and your original files in case the printer needs to access them.

     Cheers!

     Nathan
     

  • In reply to Nathan Segal:

    Yes indeed. I always work in RGB due to the large gamut of colors. Better for color correcting and modifications than cmyk. Converting to the proper color space when needed and saving as so as to not trash the master file.

     

  • In reply to Nathan Segal:

    Nathan Segal
    One piece of advice I got from a printer is to not convert your files to CMYK. Do all the work in RGB, save all your original work as TIF or CPT, then take the work to the printer and make them responsible. In my experience, that makes life easier

     

    Nathan, this may make your life easier, and also it may work with that print shop, but reality show another story. Prepress is image editor responsibility since computer took place. In the other side, if the print shop, newspaper, etc has to adjust the image, it is going to produce an extra charge, that the client or the artist should paid for. Also, how are you going to tell to the print shop what are the colors in your image? You don't have a good printed proof, and you have not way to match your monitor with their monitor. How are you going to tell to the pressman that you and/or your client are not satisfied with what they printed, and that they should print your job again without extra cost?

     

  • In reply to Nathan Segal:

    I don't disagree with working in RGB or sending RGB images for expanded gamut output.  But for my clients I want images as images and fonts and vectors as fonts and vectors.

    If the job is for expanded gamut you can leave RGB objects and images as RGB as long as you communicate the internal RGB color space used for creating the file.

    Assuming that you have a reasonable calibrated system, if your output is for CMYK press, call me and I'll tell you what TIC we support for your job.   Then convert all your file content to CMYK before sending the file to me.  Convert your images from their residing RGB color space to the CMYK profile you have chosen and convert all vectors to CMYK.

    Since CMYK press work flows pass CMYK numbers along we can reproduce and CMYK profile that fits within the TIC. 

  • In reply to Michael Cervantes:

    Michael Cervantes

    Nathan, this may make your life easier, and also it may work with that print shop, but reality show another story. Prepress is image editor responsibility since computer took place. In the other side, if the print shop, newspaper, etc has to adjust the image, it is going to produce an extra charge, that the client or the artist should paid for. Also, how are you going to tell to the print shop what are the colors in your image? You don't have a good printed proof, and you have not way to match your monitor with their monitor. How are you going to tell to the pressman that you and/or your client are not satisfied with what they printed, and that they should print your job again without extra cost?

     

     

    Michael. Fair enough. I realize what I said won't work for everybody, it was presented as one of many options. It's up to each user to check things out and find out what works for them.

    N. 

  • In reply to Richard Reilly:

    Hi Fluid,

    OK, I blame myself - I'll try another way. :-)

    I'm not saving the master file to a jpeg as you suggest. I consider the
    original image - from a camera for ex - the "master". Often this happens
    to be a JPEG.

    When this file is brought into PP, 99% of the time it will need some
    repair or optimization. To wildly various degrees.

    Once cropping, color correction, sharpening, masking etc. are done, the
    user has a choice. IMO, if they choose CPT, they've just painted
    themselves into a corner. They become tethered to PP to re-open that
    corrected file.

    You'd wrote: "Obviously that file type is limited with opening in other
    apps yet that is why one would "save as" to an applicable file type."

    I agree with you 100%. That's why I'm suggesting saving to a format like
    PSD that can be opened by lots of programs, not just photoshop. Saving
    as a PSD is 4th on my list, relative to more common formats which are
    all equally lossless.

    What's odd here is that I know you use Photoshop, I barely do. And yet
    I'm recommending saving to PSD. What's up with that? :-)

    So, there's nothing "wrong" with the CPT format. But I think there are
    serious advantages to saving a master copy as any one of several other
    formats instead, because;

    1. CPT isn't supported for quick viewing, in any program I know of. This
    means if one were to save a bunch of files in a folder, the only way
    they could "quickly" view them is by launching PP. Very impractical, and
    this isn't what I consider "quick viewing".

    2. CPT's have extremely limited ability to be opened or imported into
    any other program than PP, as we agree. Archiving hundreds of corrected
    files as CPT's instead of tiffs/psd's/png's is sub optimal. You'd be
    dependent on having PP loaded on a system. 5-10 years from now, who
    knows what will happen with PP.

    Archiving as either tiff's/psd's/png's... I'm am 100% confident would be
    a prudent choice for an archive. I don't use Photoshop, but it's not
    going away. I'd choose this if I need multiple alpha channels and
    objects/layers, which is almost never. When I "fix" a pic, it's done in
    one sitting, I never need to edit it again. Maybe some folks who do
    portraits or something need to use a format like CPT to keep coming back
    to a pic after sleeping on it. But for most people, when a pic is fixed,
    there's no need to edit it again. That's why I choose PNG most of the
    time. If only it supported CMYK...

    Jeff


    fluid wrote:
    > I got ya. My whole thinking is like working with a cdr file. If I am
    > given a eps file to manipulate and modify for a web graphic. I import
    > into draw, make my edits and save the cdr file. I then export the cdr
    > file as a png, jpeg, gif for the web purpose. If I am sending to a
    > vendor it is exported as ai, eps or pdf. The cdr being the "master
    > file" If the file is brought into PP and edited (color correction,
    > masking, etc.) why would you save that back to a jpeg and not keep it
    > the native PP format? Obviously that file type is limited with opening
    > in other apps yet that is why one would "save as" to an applicable file
    > type.
    >